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About Us

In 1964, Governor Mark Hatfield established the Governor’s Commission on the Status of Women to advise him of the needs and concerns of Oregon women.  In 1983, Governor Victor Atiyeh gave the commission independent agency status, with a directive to continue its mission to strive for the implementation of programs and policies benefiting women. The Oregon Commission for Women was legislatively established in 1983 to work for women’s equality. The commission does this by advocating for women in the community, providing information on women to the governor and state legislature, serving as a link for women to state agencies, and providing services to individual women in Oregon. The commission meets to gather information about the status of women across Oregon. This year, it will publish a handbook called Oregon Women and the Law, as well as working on public/private collaborations to benefit Oregon women.

We celebrate the accomplishments of women in Oregon through our annual Women of Achievement Awards Dinner. We also provide a place for information dissemination, connection, collaboration and partnership among women serving agencies throughout Oregon.

Oregon Commission for Women Commissioners

Principles & Values Statement

We believe:

  • In the importance of cultural, ethnic, gender, age, and ability diversity in the workplace, education system, and other venues and protection against discrimination
  • That all women deserve full and equal treatment under the law
  • That women deserve equal employment opportunities and treatment
  • In the importance of access to information and resources for women needing housing, legal help, food, education, health care, counseling, and business startup capital
  • That women need improved access to educational and training opportunities
  • That it is important to celebrate and provide education about women’s achievements in all areas

Goals

  1. To advocate for cultural, ethnic, gender, age, and ability diversity in the workplace, educational system, and other venues, and seek meaningful protection against discrimination
  2. To advocate for full and equal treatment of women under the law
  3. To advocate for equal opportunity and treatment for women in employment
  4. To ensure that women in need of housing, legal help, food, education, health care, counseling, business startup capital, etc. have access to information and resources
  5. To advocate for equality of educational and training opportunities for women in Oregon
  6. To celebrate with and educate Oregonians about women’s achievements in all areas
  7. To increase the viability and visibility of the Commission for Women

The Annual Women of Achievement Awards Celebration

This marks the Silver Anniversary of the Women of Achievement Awards. Throughout the years, we have honored 63 women from all walks of life, including homemakers, an astronaut, businesswomen, politicians, community advocates and tradeswomen. A diverse group of women from all regions of the State are part of the Women of Achievement Hall of Fame.